SRQ Daily Apr 9, 2022 – Saturday Perspectives Edition – SRQ Magazine

Disclaimer: These articles have been sourced from internet, Estrategya doesn’t own or in any way belives any opinion as projected in these articles.

SUBSCRIBE
TODAY
Get fresh stories about our hometown in your inbox. Every day, we'll send you the latest local news, restaurants, philanthropy, shopping, recreation, community events, business and more. Perfect to enjoy over your morning coffee!
« Back To SRQ Daily Archive

“The lessons learned through those dialogues can be applied not only during their time at New College but also as they begin to explore potential career paths and engage in the community after they graduate.”

[Under The Hood]  More Purple Than First Apparent
Jacob Ogles, [email protected]

The race for Sarasota County Commission in District 2 just got significantly more interesting.

Former Sarasota Mayor Fredd Atkins, the first Black Commissioner in city history, joined the race on the Democratic side two years after county commissioners rather maliciously drew him out of a district where he had been filed to run. He joins a primary with sitting City Commissioner (and former Mayor) Hagen Brody and beach activist Mike Cosentino. All vie for the chance this fall to take on incumbent County Commissioner Christian Ziegler, presuming the Republican runs for a second term.

I must admit as a member of the press, reporters are salivating. For one, this is the first time there’s been a high-stakes Democratic primary in contemporary times. Sure there’s been interesting fights for nonpartisan offices like City Commission and School Board. But to have a closed primary with folks jockeying for credibility on the left? This hasn’t happened in Sarasota County since Dwight Eisenhower was president. On top of that, every candidate here is delightfully colorful with a long list of well-known strengths and flaws. At the end of the rainbow of deep blue infighting is a genuine toss-up in the fall.

Yes, I said toss-up. A look at voter registration numbers in District 2 should dispel the notion this race will be a slam-dunk for the Democratic nominee. But there’s also little doubt why Ziegler wanted so badly to get rid of single-member districts before running for a second term. Colleagues truly did leave him to the wolves — or more appropriately to the donkeys — to fend for himself in a seat that leans blue. Still, it’s hardly unwinnable, especially for an incumbent in a climate that appears good for Republicans overall.

As of April 1, the Sarasota County Supervisor of elections reports District 2 was home to 25,632 active Democrats and 23,708 active Republicans. There’s another 17,246 independent and third-party voters as well. That works out to 38.5% Democrats in the active voter pool compared to 35.6% Republicans, or roughly a 3-percentage-point edge.

That’s a good environment for Atkins, Brody or whoever bears the Democratic standard in the fall. Certainly it’s better to run a district race than for any Democrat to have to fight in a county where 43% of active voters countywide are Republican compared to 29.3% who are Democrats.

But there’s some asterisks that have to be put on the edge. The numbers would be greater for Dems but for the fact inactive voters, ones at risk of falling off the polls, break even more Democratic in the district. About 37.9% of inactive voters in the seat are (or were) registered Democrat, and 30.4% are Republicans. 

Also, enthusiastic registration of new voters continues to favor Republicans across the board, including in District 2. Last April, Democrats made up just shy of 40% of registered voters in the district. A near 5-percentage-point advantage was nearly cut in half over the last 12 months. A gap of 2,950 voters dropped to 1,924. Between the voters Democrats lose and the ones Republicans continue to gain, the district becomes more purple by the day.

Now consider the potential ramifications of a nasty primary. Anyone who believes there’s no risk of divisiveness in an Atkins-Brody race hasn’t met either candidate. Mix in the national dynamic of an unpopular Democratic president and a party out of power who wants to turn all its voters out for the midterms and Ziegler doesn’t seem so doomed.

That’s not to talk up the incumbent’s chances. The sharply partisan rhetoric that defined his career wasn’t built for swing seats. A Republican the other day grumbled to me about Ziegler’s rhetoric about his “woke” critics during continued controversy over incentives being awarded to Rumble. He’s on Twitter every day touting Donald Trump and attacking public education.

Bottom line, every candidate has their case. Every one has their flaws. And nobody should plan to pop the champagne early on Election Day.

Jacob Ogles is contributing senior editor for SRQ MEDIA. 

Image courtesy Sarasota County Supervisor of Elections: District 2 party demographics.

[Higher Education]  Leadership Program Connects Students with Career Mentors
Patricia Okker, [email protected]

From day one, we are preparing our students at New College of Florida to enter the competitive workforce—with everything from personalized career coaching to networking opportunities and leadership training.

One of our most exciting initiatives is our Certificate in Leadership: Liberal Arts Work in the Real World program, which was launched early last year by our Center for Career Engagement and Opportunity (CEO).

Since its inception, the certificate program has invited multiple professionals to New College for “campus conversations,” giving our students a firsthand glimpse of what leadership looks like. For example, Target CEO Brian Cornell visited New College in mid-March to share leadership lessons with our students during an in-depth, in-person discussion. 

“Our leadership certificate offers students the ability to connect with varying levels of leadership on an intimate basis,” says Patricia Courtois, one of New College’s Professionals in Residence, and the head instructor and coordinator of the certificate program. “The lessons learned through those dialogues can be applied not only during their time at New College but also as they begin to explore potential career paths and engage in the community after they graduate.”

Courtois knew Cornell would be an ideal speaker for the program, having worked with him in the mid-1990s at Tropicana. Cornell talked quite a bit at New College about overcoming business challenges brought on by the pandemic, giving our students excellent insights about strategy and resilience. 

Some of the other workshops and talks in the certificate program have included “Collaboration Through Teamwork” with Art Lambert, co-founder of S-One Holdings Corporation; “Creativity Works Everywhere” with David Bonner, the chief creative officer at On Ideas; “Leadership Exists at Any Level” with Jeff Lundy, Ph.D., a New College alumnus and the senior director of public policy development, data and analytics for PepsiCo; and “Effecting Change in the Workplace” with Felice Schulaner, a New College alumna, coach and retired human resources executive.

Courtois’ ability to teach our students about leadership—and to bring in outside experts in numerous industries—gives our students at New College a major competitive edge.

Students who aim to earn the Certificate in Leadership participate in four 90-minute workshops in a given semester (led by Courtois and chosen guest facilitators), and participate in a practical experience such as an internship or research project. During this process, students from all areas of concentration gain the skills and insights needed to make a meaningful impact in the world.

“We discuss everything from creativity to collaboration to effecting change, all through a lens of our participating students and their own passions and career goals,” Courtois says. “I enjoy providing my take on how I’ve learned to fail forward. Also, the unique culture of New College and its students inspires me.” 

Courtois has spent more than 40 years leading communications and corporate philanthropy efforts for companies and brands such as Beatrice Foods Company, Sara Lee Corporation, Tropicana, Sweet’n Low, Butter Buds, Sugar in the Raw and ClosetMaid. She has also been mentoring students for decades.

“It’s been a long and rewarding journey, helping students navigate the world outside the lecture hall,” Courtois says. “The best reward for me is when I see students I’ve mentored move on for new and more challenging experiences/jobs. I still get ‘thank you’ notes from people who remind me that I had some role in their success.”  

Dwayne Peterson, executive director for career education at New College, says all of the College’s students have the capacity to become leaders; they just need the optimal tools. The Certificate in Leadership is a prime example of one.

“We could argue that all New College students are leaders. But part of this certificate program is about trying to bring out and practice the leadership ability that lives in each New College student,” Peterson says. “Our students are collecting leadership approaches through these experiences, and really figuring out how to develop their own approaches that will serve them in their careers.”

We look forward to inviting many more high-powered leaders to our campus, as they encourage our students to develop—and pursue—their ambitious career goals.

Patricia Okker, Ph.D. is the president of New College of Florida. 

Photo of Patricia Courtois

[SOON]  FILM: The 24th Annual Sarasota Film Festival , April 1 – April 10

The 24th Annual Sarasota Film Festival will take place from April 1 to 10 at CMX CinéBistro Siesta Key. Independent and International narratives, docs and shorts are programmed into a schedule of over 100 features, themed shorts packages and additional programming sidebars that change each year to reflect the strengths of submitted films. Festival events include socially-driven parties and private receptions to honor guest filmmakers, community-wide street festivals and the black-tie Filmmakers Tribute Dinner. SFF patrons have enjoyed intimate performances from Aerosmith and The B52’s as well as a host of special appearances from local and international musicians. A host of guests and filmmakers attend to promote their films and celebrate the accomplishments of their peers.

[SOON]  MUSIC: Sarasota Orchestra: Pops: Great American Songbook , April 8 – April 9, 7:30pm and 2:30pm

Hear the tunes Nat King Cole was talking about when he crooned, “Unforgettable.” Celebrated Pops conductor Sean O’Loughlin leads a program of romantic anthems featuring exciting vocalists on Friday, April 8 at 7:30pm at the Van Wezel and Saturday, April 9 at 2:30pm and 7:30pm at the Van Wezel. Music will include Frank Sinatra’s “Come Fly with Me,” Etta James’ “At Last,” and Cole’s “Nature Boy.”

[SOON]  MUSIC: Key Chorale: American Roots: Bluegrass , April 8 – April 10, 7:30pm-9:30pm and 4pm-6pm

American Roots: Bluegrass will take place on April 8 7:30pm-9:30pm, April 9 4pm-6pm, and April 10, 2022 4pm-6pm. A genre-bending fusion of Bluegrass and folk meets choral music featuring the tight vocal harmonies and virtuosic playing of The Lubben Brothers. The Lubben Brothers is an acoustic group made up of triplet brothers, Michael, Tom, and Joshua. The brothers specialize in sublime vocals as well as a unique blend of folk instruments including banjo, mandolin, tin whistle, accordion, hammered dulcimer, and fiddle. Classically trained at a young age, their modern songwriting style incorporates folk roots, pop and bluegrass.

[SOON]  DANCE: Dance For Child Abuse Prevention , April 9, 3:30-5:30pm

Local Zumba Fitness instructors are hosting a “Dance For Child Abuse Prevention.” Zumba classes will be offered to participants. Food Trucks and vendors will be availible from 3:30-5:30 pm, and a raffle will take place at 5pm. Guets of all ages are welcome and encouraged to wear blue. A donatation of $20 is encouraged. 

[SOON]  MUSIC: Sarasota Orchestra: Chamber Soirees: Quintessential Clarinet , April 10, 4pm

Sarasota Orchestra Principal Clarinetist Bharat Chandra in a program of music highlighting this most versatile of instruments on Sunday, April 10 at 4pm at Holley Hall. Inspired by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow’s A Psalm of Life. This program consists of Coleridge-Taylor Clarinet Quintet and Brahms Clarinet Quintet.

[SOON]  MUSIC: La Musica International Chamber Music Festival: Strut and Fret , April 10, 3pm

Concert III, Strut and Fret, will take place on April 10, 2022 at 3pm at Sarasota Opera House. Single concert tickets are $50. There will be a pre-concert talk with Robert Sherman at 2:15pm. Grammy Award-winning guitarist Jason Vieaux returns to perform in contemporary and Classical quintets, contrasted with the lush Dvorak quintet for piano and strings. Luigi Boccherini, Guitar Quintet in D Major, G.448, “Fandango”, Giacomo Susani, Quintet for Guitar and String Quartet, and Antonin Dvorak, Quintet for Piano and Strings in A Major, Op. 81. Benny Kim, violin; Ruth Lenz, violin; Cynthia Phelps, viola; Dmitri Atapine, cello; Christine J. Lee, cello; Wendy Chen, piano; Jason Vieaux, guitar.

[SOON]  PERFORMANCE: Van Wezel: Terry Fator: Who’s The Dummy Now? , April 10, 7pm

TERRY FATOR is the most gifted and accomplished ventriloquist/singer on the planet, whose repertoire includes more than 200 celebrity voices, many of whom we see on stage. Being onstage is Terry’s lifeblood, and he is wildly excited to return to the stage to share his talents with his fans. Who’s the Dummy Now? is a comedic and musical “origin story,” in which we explore what makes Terry tick and how he came up with the puppets who are his partners on stage. Nothing connects people like laughter and song, and Terry is so grateful to once again have the opportunity to bring people together under the same roof on Sunday, April 10 at 7pm after a year of being apart.

[SOON]  MUSIC: Ring Sarasota Performance , April 10, 4pm
Join Sarasotas premier handbell ensemble for a performance of songs from the stage and screen! The ensemble will ring out tunes from movies, musicals and TV, along with a selection of original songs.

Peace Presbyterian Church, Lakewood Ranch

The race for Sarasota County Commission in District 2 just got significantly more interesting.
Former Sarasota Mayor Fredd Atkins, the first Black Commissioner in city history, joined the race on the Democratic side two years after county commissioners rather maliciously drew him out of a district where he had been filed to run. He joins a primary with sitting City Commissioner (and former Mayor) Hagen Brody and beach activist Mike Cosentino. All vie for the chance this fall to take on incumbent County Commissioner Christian Ziegler, presuming the Republican runs for a second term.
I must admit as a member of the press, reporters are salivating. For one, this is the first time there’s been a high-stakes Democratic primary in contemporary times. Sure there’s been interesting fights for nonpartisan offices like City Commission and School Board. But to have a closed primary with folks jockeying for credibility on the left? This hasn’t happened in Sarasota County since Dwight Eisenhower was president. On top of that, every candidate here is delightfully colorful with a long list of well-known strengths and flaws. At the end of the rainbow of deep blue infighting is a genuine toss-up in the fall.
Yes, I said toss-up. A look at voter registration numbers in District 2 should dispel the notion this race will be a slam-dunk for the Democratic nominee. But there’s also little doubt why Ziegler wanted so badly to get rid of single-member districts before running for a second term. Colleagues truly did leave him to the wolves — or more appropriately to the donkeys — to fend for himself in a seat that leans blue. Still, it’s hardly unwinnable, especially for an incumbent in a climate that appears good for Republicans overall.
As of April 1, the Sarasota County Supervisor of elections reports District 2 was home to 25,632 active Democrats and 23,708 active Republicans. There’s another 17,246 independent and third-party voters as well. That works out to 38.5% Democrats in the active voter pool compared to 35.6% Republicans, or roughly a 3-percentage-point edge.
That’s a good environment for Atkins, Brody or whoever bears the Democratic standard in the fall. Certainly it’s better to run a district race than for any Democrat to have to fight in a county where 43% of active voters countywide are Republican compared to 29.3% who are Democrats.
But there’s some asterisks that have to be put on the edge. The numbers would be greater for Dems but for the fact inactive voters, ones at risk of falling off the polls, break even more Democratic in the district. About 37.9% of inactive voters in the seat are (or were) registered Democrat, and 30.4% are Republicans. 
Also, enthusiastic registration of new voters continues to favor Republicans across the board, including in District 2. Last April, Democrats made up just shy of 40% of registered voters in the district. A near 5-percentage-point advantage was nearly cut in half over the last 12 months. A gap of 2,950 voters dropped to 1,924. Between the voters Democrats lose and the ones Republicans continue to gain, the district becomes more purple by the day.
Now consider the potential ramifications of a nasty primary. Anyone who believes there’s no risk of divisiveness in an Atkins-Brody race hasn’t met either candidate. Mix in the national dynamic of an unpopular Democratic president and a party out of power who wants to turn all its voters out for the midterms and Ziegler doesn’t seem so doomed.
That’s not to talk up the incumbent’s chances. The sharply partisan rhetoric that defined his career wasn’t built for swing seats. A Republican the other day grumbled to me about Ziegler’s rhetoric about his “woke” critics during continued controversy over incentives being awarded to Rumble. He’s on Twitter every day touting Donald Trump and attacking public education.
Bottom line, every candidate has their case. Every one has their flaws. And nobody should plan to pop the champagne early on Election Day.
Jacob Ogles is contributing senior editor for SRQ MEDIA. 
Image courtesy Sarasota County Supervisor of Elections: District 2 party demographics.
From day one, we are preparing our students at New College of Florida to enter the competitive workforce—with everything from personalized career coaching to networking opportunities and leadership training.
One of our most exciting initiatives is our Certificate in Leadership: Liberal Arts Work in the Real World program, which was launched early last year by our Center for Career Engagement and Opportunity (CEO).
Since its inception, the certificate program has invited multiple professionals to New College for “campus conversations,” giving our students a firsthand glimpse of what leadership looks like. For example, Target CEO Brian Cornell visited New College in mid-March to share leadership lessons with our students during an in-depth, in-person discussion. 
“Our leadership certificate offers students the ability to connect with varying levels of leadership on an intimate basis,” says Patricia Courtois, one of New College’s Professionals in Residence, and the head instructor and coordinator of the certificate program. “The lessons learned through those dialogues can be applied not only during their time at New College but also as they begin to explore potential career paths and engage in the community after they graduate.”
Courtois knew Cornell would be an ideal speaker for the program, having worked with him in the mid-1990s at Tropicana. Cornell talked quite a bit at New College about overcoming business challenges brought on by the pandemic, giving our students excellent insights about strategy and resilience. 
Some of the other workshops and talks in the certificate program have included “Collaboration Through Teamwork” with Art Lambert, co-founder of S-One Holdings Corporation; “Creativity Works Everywhere” with David Bonner, the chief creative officer at On Ideas; “Leadership Exists at Any Level” with Jeff Lundy, Ph.D., a New College alumnus and the senior director of public policy development, data and analytics for PepsiCo; and “Effecting Change in the Workplace” with Felice Schulaner, a New College alumna, coach and retired human resources executive.
Courtois’ ability to teach our students about leadership—and to bring in outside experts in numerous industries—gives our students at New College a major competitive edge.
Students who aim to earn the Certificate in Leadership participate in four 90-minute workshops in a given semester (led by Courtois and chosen guest facilitators), and participate in a practical experience such as an internship or research project. During this process, students from all areas of concentration gain the skills and insights needed to make a meaningful impact in the world.
“We discuss everything from creativity to collaboration to effecting change, all through a lens of our participating students and their own passions and career goals,” Courtois says. “I enjoy providing my take on how I’ve learned to fail forward. Also, the unique culture of New College and its students inspires me.” 
Courtois has spent more than 40 years leading communications and corporate philanthropy efforts for companies and brands such as Beatrice Foods Company, Sara Lee Corporation, Tropicana, Sweet’n Low, Butter Buds, Sugar in the Raw and ClosetMaid. She has also been mentoring students for decades.
“It’s been a long and rewarding journey, helping students navigate the world outside the lecture hall,” Courtois says. “The best reward for me is when I see students I’ve mentored move on for new and more challenging experiences/jobs. I still get ‘thank you’ notes from people who remind me that I had some role in their success.”  
Dwayne Peterson, executive director for career education at New College, says all of the College’s students have the capacity to become leaders; they just need the optimal tools. The Certificate in Leadership is a prime example of one.
“We could argue that all New College students are leaders. But part of this certificate program is about trying to bring out and practice the leadership ability that lives in each New College student,” Peterson says. “Our students are collecting leadership approaches through these experiences, and really figuring out how to develop their own approaches that will serve them in their careers.”
We look forward to inviting many more high-powered leaders to our campus, as they encourage our students to develop—and pursue—their ambitious career goals.
Patricia Okker, Ph.D. is the president of New College of Florida. 
Photo of Patricia Courtois

[SOON]  FILM: The 24th Annual Sarasota Film Festival , April 1 – April 10

The 24th Annual Sarasota Film Festival will take place from April 1 to 10 at CMX CinéBistro Siesta Key. Independent and International narratives, docs and shorts are programmed into a schedule of over 100 features, themed shorts packages and additional programming sidebars that change each year to reflect the strengths of submitted films. Festival events include socially-driven parties and private receptions to honor guest filmmakers, community-wide street festivals and the black-tie Filmmakers Tribute Dinner. SFF patrons have enjoyed intimate performances from Aerosmith and The B52’s as well as a host of special appearances from local and international musicians. A host of guests and filmmakers attend to promote their films and celebrate the accomplishments of their peers.

[SOON]  MUSIC: Sarasota Orchestra: Pops: Great American Songbook , April 8 – April 9, 7:30pm and 2:30pm

Hear the tunes Nat King Cole was talking about when he crooned, “Unforgettable.” Celebrated Pops conductor Sean O’Loughlin leads a program of romantic anthems featuring exciting vocalists on Friday, April 8 at 7:30pm at the Van Wezel and Saturday, April 9 at 2:30pm and 7:30pm at the Van Wezel. Music will include Frank Sinatra’s “Come Fly with Me,” Etta James’ “At Last,” and Cole’s “Nature Boy.”

[SOON]  MUSIC: Key Chorale: American Roots: Bluegrass , April 8 – April 10, 7:30pm-9:30pm and 4pm-6pm

American Roots: Bluegrass will take place on April 8 7:30pm-9:30pm, April 9 4pm-6pm, and April 10, 2022 4pm-6pm. A genre-bending fusion of Bluegrass and folk meets choral music featuring the tight vocal harmonies and virtuosic playing of The Lubben Brothers. The Lubben Brothers is an acoustic group made up of triplet brothers, Michael, Tom, and Joshua. The brothers specialize in sublime vocals as well as a unique blend of folk instruments including banjo, mandolin, tin whistle, accordion, hammered dulcimer, and fiddle. Classically trained at a young age, their modern songwriting style incorporates folk roots, pop and bluegrass.

[SOON]  DANCE: Dance For Child Abuse Prevention , April 9, 3:30-5:30pm

Local Zumba Fitness instructors are hosting a “Dance For Child Abuse Prevention.” Zumba classes will be offered to participants. Food Trucks and vendors will be availible from 3:30-5:30 pm, and a raffle will take place at 5pm. Guets of all ages are welcome and encouraged to wear blue. A donatation of $20 is encouraged. 

[SOON]  MUSIC: Sarasota Orchestra: Chamber Soirees: Quintessential Clarinet , April 10, 4pm

Sarasota Orchestra Principal Clarinetist Bharat Chandra in a program of music highlighting this most versatile of instruments on Sunday, April 10 at 4pm at Holley Hall. Inspired by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow’s A Psalm of Life. This program consists of Coleridge-Taylor Clarinet Quintet and Brahms Clarinet Quintet.

[SOON]  MUSIC: La Musica International Chamber Music Festival: Strut and Fret , April 10, 3pm

Concert III, Strut and Fret, will take place on April 10, 2022 at 3pm at Sarasota Opera House. Single concert tickets are $50. There will be a pre-concert talk with Robert Sherman at 2:15pm. Grammy Award-winning guitarist Jason Vieaux returns to perform in contemporary and Classical quintets, contrasted with the lush Dvorak quintet for piano and strings. Luigi Boccherini, Guitar Quintet in D Major, G.448, “Fandango”, Giacomo Susani, Quintet for Guitar and String Quartet, and Antonin Dvorak, Quintet for Piano and Strings in A Major, Op. 81. Benny Kim, violin; Ruth Lenz, violin; Cynthia Phelps, viola; Dmitri Atapine, cello; Christine J. Lee, cello; Wendy Chen, piano; Jason Vieaux, guitar.

[SOON]  PERFORMANCE: Van Wezel: Terry Fator: Who’s The Dummy Now? , April 10, 7pm

TERRY FATOR is the most gifted and accomplished ventriloquist/singer on the planet, whose repertoire includes more than 200 celebrity voices, many of whom we see on stage. Being onstage is Terry’s lifeblood, and he is wildly excited to return to the stage to share his talents with his fans. Who’s the Dummy Now? is a comedic and musical “origin story,” in which we explore what makes Terry tick and how he came up with the puppets who are his partners on stage. Nothing connects people like laughter and song, and Terry is so grateful to once again have the opportunity to bring people together under the same roof on Sunday, April 10 at 7pm after a year of being apart.

[SOON]  MUSIC: Ring Sarasota Performance , April 10, 4pm
Join Sarasotas premier handbell ensemble for a performance of songs from the stage and screen! The ensemble will ring out tunes from movies, musicals and TV, along with a selection of original songs.

Peace Presbyterian Church, Lakewood Ranch

The 24th Annual Sarasota Film Festival will take place from April 1 to 10 at CMX CinéBistro Siesta Key. Independent and International narratives, docs and shorts are programmed into a schedule of over 100 features, themed shorts packages and additional programming sidebars that change each year to reflect the strengths of submitted films. Festival events include socially-driven parties and private receptions to honor guest filmmakers, community-wide street festivals and the black-tie Filmmakers Tribute Dinner. SFF patrons have enjoyed intimate performances from Aerosmith and The B52’s as well as a host of special appearances from local and international musicians. A host of guests and filmmakers attend to promote their films and celebrate the accomplishments of their peers.
Hear the tunes Nat King Cole was talking about when he crooned, “Unforgettable.” Celebrated Pops conductor Sean O’Loughlin leads a program of romantic anthems featuring exciting vocalists on Friday, April 8 at 7:30pm at the Van Wezel and Saturday, April 9 at 2:30pm and 7:30pm at the Van Wezel. Music will include Frank Sinatra’s “Come Fly with Me,” Etta James’ “At Last,” and Cole’s “Nature Boy.”
American Roots: Bluegrass will take place on April 8 7:30pm-9:30pm, April 9 4pm-6pm, and April 10, 2022 4pm-6pm. A genre-bending fusion of Bluegrass and folk meets choral music featuring the tight vocal harmonies and virtuosic playing of The Lubben Brothers. The Lubben Brothers is an acoustic group made up of triplet brothers, Michael, Tom, and Joshua. The brothers specialize in sublime vocals as well as a unique blend of folk instruments including banjo, mandolin, tin whistle, accordion, hammered dulcimer, and fiddle. Classically trained at a young age, their modern songwriting style incorporates folk roots, pop and bluegrass.
Local Zumba Fitness instructors are hosting a “Dance For Child Abuse Prevention.” Zumba classes will be offered to participants. Food Trucks and vendors will be availible from 3:30-5:30 pm, and a raffle will take place at 5pm. Guets of all ages are welcome and encouraged to wear blue. A donatation of $20 is encouraged. 
Sarasota Orchestra Principal Clarinetist Bharat Chandra in a program of music highlighting this most versatile of instruments on Sunday, April 10 at 4pm at Holley Hall. Inspired by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow’s A Psalm of Life. This program consists of Coleridge-Taylor Clarinet Quintet and Brahms Clarinet Quintet.
Concert III, Strut and Fret, will take place on April 10, 2022 at 3pm at Sarasota Opera House. Single concert tickets are $50. There will be a pre-concert talk with Robert Sherman at 2:15pm. Grammy Award-winning guitarist Jason Vieaux returns to perform in contemporary and Classical quintets, contrasted with the lush Dvorak quintet for piano and strings. Luigi Boccherini, Guitar Quintet in D Major, G.448, “Fandango”, Giacomo Susani, Quintet for Guitar and String Quartet, and Antonin Dvorak, Quintet for Piano and Strings in A Major, Op. 81. Benny Kim, violin; Ruth Lenz, violin; Cynthia Phelps, viola; Dmitri Atapine, cello; Christine J. Lee, cello; Wendy Chen, piano; Jason Vieaux, guitar.
TERRY FATOR is the most gifted and accomplished ventriloquist/singer on the planet, whose repertoire includes more than 200 celebrity voices, many of whom we see on stage. Being onstage is Terry’s lifeblood, and he is wildly excited to return to the stage to share his talents with his fans. Who’s the Dummy Now? is a comedic and musical “origin story,” in which we explore what makes Terry tick and how he came up with the puppets who are his partners on stage. Nothing connects people like laughter and song, and Terry is so grateful to once again have the opportunity to bring people together under the same roof on Sunday, April 10 at 7pm after a year of being apart.
Peace Presbyterian Church, Lakewood Ranch
SRQ DAILY is produced by SRQ | The Magazine. Note: The views and opinions expressed in the Saturday Perspectives Edition and in the Letters department of SRQ DAILY are those of the author(s) and do not imply endorsement by SRQ Media. Senior Editor Jacob Ogles edits the Saturday Perspective Edition, Letters and Guest Contributor columns.In the CocoTele department, SRQ DAILY is providing excerpts from news releases as a public service. Reference to any specific product or entity does not constitute an endorsement or recommendation by SRQ DAILY. The views expressed by individuals are their own and their appearance in this section does not imply an endorsement of them or any entity they represent. For rates on SRQ DAILY banner advertising and sponsored content opportunities, please contact Ashley Ryan Cannon at 941-365-7702 x211 or via email
Curating New Worlds
Dylan Campbell | Apr 1, 2022
Cinematic Sarasota
Abby Weingarten | Apr 1, 2022
King of Vintage
Kellianne Hoton | Apr 1, 2022
April Showers
Compiled by Arianna Boenker | Apr 1, 2022
Celebrate the sprit of our hometown with SRQ Magazine. Published 10x a year, SRQ Magazine captures the people, tastes, culture, boutiques and philanthropic hearts of Sarasota, Bradenton Area and the Barrier Islands on the West Coast of Florida. We invite you to experience living and loving local—in print and online. Welcome to the SRQ family!
SRQ Media transforms what it means to live and love local through its portfolio of hyper-local print and online publications including its flagship city regional SRQ Magazine, its documentary, and video production division Moving Stories and non-profit development division Story Project. The SRQ Media team leverages its strong audience footprint to catalyze visionary community programs such as SB2: Regional Symposia Series, Women in Business, SMARTgirl, SkillSHARE and ProjecThinkby engaging individuals to positively impact their hometown of Sarasota and the Bradenton Area situated on the vibrant West Coast of Florida.
SRQ Media supports regional charitable, cultural and education organizations and not-profits throughout the year with custom programs and sponsorships.
© SRQ MEDIA | Live Local. Love Local. All rights reserved. 331 S. Pineapple Avenue, Sarasota, Florida 34236

source

Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on twitter
Twitter
Share on linkedin
LinkedIn
Share on pinterest
Pinterest

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published.

JOIN THE CLUB!

It’s easy: all we need is your email & your eternal love. But we’ll settle for your email.